CLASSICAL STUDIES

Unit 1: Semester 1

Mythical Worlds
This unit has three main areas of focus. Firstly “Heroes and Monsters” maintains a focus on myths in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Secondly “Myths and Archaeology” investigates the possible archaeological bases of myths. Thirdly “Myths in Art and Literature” explores how artistic literary forms expressed in art, architecture, drama and the like reinforced the significance of myths. 

At the conclusion of this unit, students should be able to: explain the nature of myths and legends in classical societies and cultures and explain the importance of archaeology in establishing the possible historical basis of myths and legends.

ASSESSMENT
1. Coursework (25%)
2. Written Tasks (25%)
3. Research Tasks (25%)
4. Examination (25%)

Unit 2: Semester 2

Classical Imaginations
This unit has two main areas of focus. Firstly “Society through Culture” examines classical Greece or Rome through the exploration of a classical work or works. Secondly “Classics through Time” allows for consideration of the classical legacy by discussing the relationship between classical works and a work from a later period.
At the conclusion of this unit, students should be able to: explain the way in which the classical society functioned and identify the earliest examples, features and conventions of at least two forms of classical expression.

ASSESSMENT
1. Coursework (25%)
2. Written Tasks (25%)
3. Research Tasks (25%)
4. Examination (25%)

Units 3 and 4: Semesters 1 and 2

Classical Worlds
What was it in the ancient Greek imagination which inspired the extraordinary developments of the classical period? What happened so suddenly to make Athens the centre of art, politics, architecture and theatre? What tragic flaws brought about the demise of the Athenian empire? These units explore fifth century BC Greece, concentrating on the nucleus of Athenian influence. Classical Greek culture is defined by the sophistication of its distinctly human focus. We trace the advance of humanism through the examination of theatre, sculpture, architecture, politics and historical events so that students come to see how an ancient civilisation informed the development of Western culture.
At the conclusion of these units students should be able to: evaluate the relationship between historical events and aesthetic artefacts in assessing the effect of historical events in the human imagination through the examination of a number of classical texts; and evaluate the ongoing significance of the classical heritage within the Western tradition by identifying the artefacts which best express the essence of the classical. Students will study a total of six classical texts; two in isolation and two pairs of texts in comparison.

ASSESSMENT
1. Coursework – Unit 3 (25%)
2. Coursework – Unit 4 (25%)
3. Examination (50%)