CLASSICAL STUDIES

 

Why Classical Worlds still matter

An exploration of the Ancient Greek and Roman cultures, values and ideas through classical mythology, literature, art and history enables students to gain an insight into gender politics, authority and power, heroism, glory, man and the universe, human societies and the limitations of the western world. This course encourages students to consider the way we understand our own world and think about ourselves and others. Many of our current assumptions have been derived from our understanding and interpretation of the classical worlds. Students will also develop analytical and critical thinking skills that are invaluable for tertiary study and many future careers.

Unit 1: Semester 1

Mythical Worlds
This unit has three main areas of focus. Firstly “Gods, Heroes and Monsters” maintains a focus on myths in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Secondly “Myths and Archaeology” investigates the possible archaeological basis for myths. Thirdly “Myths in Classical Culture” explores how artistic literary forms expressed in art, architecture, drama and the like reinforced the significance of myths.

At the conclusion of this unit, students will be able to: explain the nature of myths and legends in classical societies and cultures and explain the importance of archaeology in establishing the possible historical basis of myths and legends.

ASSESSMENT
1. Coursework (25%)
2. Written Tasks (25%)
3. Research Tasks (25%)
4. Examination (25%)

Unit 2: Semester 2

Classical Worlds
This unit has two main areas of focus. Firstly “Society through Culture” examines Ancient Greece and/or Ancient Rome through the exploration of a classical work or works. Secondly “Classics through Time” allows for consideration of the classical legacy by discussing the influence of classical works on Western civilization.

At the conclusion of this unit, students will be able to: analyse the way in which classical works reflect aspects of ancient societies and evaluate the relationship between classical works and works for a later period.

ASSESSMENT
1. Coursework (25%)
2. Written Tasks (25%)
3. Research Tasks (25%)
4. Examination (25%)

Units 3 and 4: Semesters 1 and 2

Classical Works
What was it in the ancient Greek and Roman imaginations which inspired the extraordinary developments in the classical period? What happened so suddenly to make Athens the centre of art, politics, architecture and theatre? What tragic flaws brought about the demise of the Athenian empire? How did the Romans see themselves? What defined the Roman empire?  Units 3 and 4 trace the advance of humanism through the examination of theatre, sculpture, architecture, politics and historical events in both Ancient Greece and Rome.
At the conclusion of these units students will evaluate the relationship between historical events and material evidence in assessing the effect of historical events on the production of individual works.  Students will study a total of six classical texts; two in isolation and two pairs of texts in comparison.

ASSESSMENT
1. Coursework – Unit 3 (25%)
2. Coursework – Unit 4 (25%)
3. Examination (50%)